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I am Who you say I Am Bible Verse (2024)

I am Who you say I Am Bible Verse ( I am that I am)

I am Who you say I am Bible Verse – The Bible verse “I am who you say I am” is an iconic phrase that has been uttered by Jesus in multiple instances throughout the Bible. This statement is seen as a powerful reminder that Jesus is in fact God. The phrase has been used to demonstrate Jesus’ divinity and to emphasize his power and authority, as well as to serve as a guide for Christians in their own lives.

Through this statement, Jesus also emphasizes the importance of believing and trusting in God. When Jesus uttered these words, he was affirming his own identity and asserting his authority over all things. Christians can take comfort in knowing that Jesus is God and that he is in control of all things, even when times seem uncertain.

I am Who you say I am Bible Verse – I Am That I Am

The phrase “I am That I am” is one of the most famous and iconic quotes from the Bible. It is part of Exodus 3:14, “God said to Moses, ‘I am that I am.’” This phrase is often used to refer to the existence and sovereignty of God. It is a powerful declaration of God’s self-existence and timelessness.

This phrase has been studied and discussed by theologians, philosophers, and religious scholars throughout the centuries. It has been used to examine and understand the nature of God and to explain the relationship between God and man. In this blog, we will explore the phrase “I am That I am” and its implications for understanding the divine.

All Scripture is God Breathed

The story of when Moses asked God who his name was is one of the most iconic and powerful stories in the Bible. It is a story of faith and courage, as Moses courageously asked God a seemingly impossible question and was rewarded with the knowledge of His true name. In this blog, we will explore the history behind this momentous event and discuss the implications of its impact on the Jewish faith.

I am Who you say I Am Bible Verse ( I am that I am)

First, let’s look at the biblical account of the event. In Exodus 3:13-15, God tells Moses that He is the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Moses then asks for His name, to which God responds, “I am who I am.” This is often interpreted to mean that God is eternal and unchangeable, and that He is not limited by any human conception of Him.

The importance of this event in the Jewish faith extends beyond its literal meaning. This momentous event is seen as the foundation for a strong relationship between God and the Jews, as it showed that God was interested in Moses and willing to reveal Himself to him. It also showed that God was willing to go beyond His own laws, as He allowed Moses to ask a seemingly impossible question and then answered it.

This event has had a major impact on Jewish religious thought, as it has been interpreted in various ways. Some see it as a sign of God’s humility, as He allowed Himself to be known by a mere human being. Others see it as proof that God is merciful and loving, as He was willing to reveal Himself to Moses despite the fact that he was a mere mortal.

No matter how it is interpreted, the event of when Moses asked God who His name was has had a profound effect on Jewish faith. It is seen as a powerful moment of grace, a reminder of God’s mercy and love, and a reminder of the importance of faith and courage. It is a story that will continue to be told for generations to come, and it is a reminder that God is willing to go beyond His own laws and reveal Himself to those who seek Him.

Exploring the Divine Name: I am That I am

The phrase “I am That I am” is a translation of the Hebrew phrase “ehyeh asher ehyeh”. This phrase is composed of two parts, ehyeh, meaning “I am”, and asher, meaning “that”. This phrase is often translated as “I am who I am” or “I will be who I will be”.

The phrase “I am That I am” can be seen as a declaration of the divine name of God. It is used to refer to the mysterious, infinite, and powerful nature of God. This phrase is often seen as a reference to God’s self-existence, His eternal nature, and His timelessness.

I am Who you say I Am Bible Verse ( I am that I am)

A Look at the Hebrew and Greek Versions of I am That I am

The phrase “I am That I am” is found in both the Hebrew and Greek versions of the Bible. In the Hebrew version, the phrase is written as “ehyeh asher ehyeh”. In the Greek version, the phrase is written as “ego eimi ho on”. The Greek version translates to “I am the one who is”.

Both versions of the phrase “I am That I am” are used to refer to the divine name of God. The phrase is used to emphasize God’s self-existence, His eternal nature, and His timelessness. It is seen as a declaration of the divine name of God and an affirmation of His power and authority over all of creation.

Etymology of the Biblical Word

The phrase “I am that I am” is one of the most well-known verses in the Bible and is a cornerstone of many religious belief systems. Its origin is steeped in mystery, with various interpretations of its meaning, and a contested etymology that has caused much debate. In this blog, we will explore the origin of this phrase and the sources of conflict surrounding its interpretations.

Origin


The phrase “I am that I am” is found in the Bible in Exodus 3:14, which reads: “And God said unto Moses, I Am That I Am: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I Am hath sent me unto you.” The phrase is repeated a few times in the Old Testament, and is thought to be a declaration of God’s name.

Hebrew


The phrase “I am that I am” is a translation of the Hebrew phrase “ehyeh asher ehyeh”. This phrase is derived from the Hebrew verb “to be”, which is “havah”. It is thought that the phrase is indicative of God’s power and authority, as it essentially translates to “I will be what I will be.”

Greek


The phrase “I am that I am” is also found in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the Septuagint. The phrase is translated as “ego eimi ho on”, which is thought to be a direct translation of the Hebrew phrase.

Aramaic


The phrase “I am that I am” is also found in the Aramaic translation of the Old Testament, the Peshitta. The phrase is translated as “ana hu”, which is thought to be derived from the Hebrew phrase “ehyeh asher ehyeh”.

Sources of Conflict


There is some debate over the exact meaning of the phrase “I am that I am”. Some scholars believe it is a statement of God’s sovereignty, while others believe it is a declaration of God’s presence. This debate has caused some conflict over the interpretation of the phrase and its implications for religious belief.

The phrase “I am that I am” is one of the most famous verses in the Bible and is the cornerstone of many religious belief systems. Its origin is steeped in mystery, with various interpretations of its meaning and a contested etymology that has caused much debate. By exploring the origin of this phrase and the sources of conflict surrounding its interpretations, we can better understand its significance.

I am Who you say I Am Bible Verse ( I am that I am)

A Comprehensive List of 8 – I Am’s in the Bible

The phrase “I am That I am” is not the only phrase used to refer to the divine name of God in the Bible. There are a number of other “I am” phrases that are used to refer to God throughout the Bible. Here is a list of some of the other “I am” phrases that can be found in the Bible:

I am the Alpha and the Omega (Revelation 1:8)

I am the Lord your God (Exodus 20:2)

I am the Lord your Healer (Exodus 15:26)

I am the Lord your Provider (Genesis 22:14)

I am the Lord your Redeemer (Isaiah 43:14)

I am the Lord your Peace (Jeremiah 29:11)

I am the Lord your Shepherd (Psalm 23:1)

I am the Lord your Righteousness (Jeremiah 33:16)

Unveiling the Significance of the I am That I am Bible Verse

The phrase “I am That I am” is a powerful declaration of God’s self-existence and His sovereignty over all of creation. It is used to emphasize the mysterious, infinite, and powerful nature of God. It is also used to illustrate the relationship between God and man.

The phrase “I am That I am” is often seen as a reminder of God’s promise to be with us always. It is a reminder that God is always with us, no matter what we may be facing or going through. The phrase “I am That I am” is a reminder that God is always present, even in times of distress or difficulty.

  1. Omnipotence – “For with God nothing shall be impossible” (Luke 1:37). This term describes God’s limitless power and ability to do anything.
  2. Omniscience – “O Lord, You have searched me and known me” (Psalm 139:1). This term describes God’s perfect knowledge of all things, including the past, present, and future.
  3. Omnipresence – “Where shall I go from Your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from Your presence?” (Psalm 139:7). This term describes God’s presence everywhere at all times.
  4. Sovereignty – “The Lord has established His throne in heaven, and His kingdom rules over all” (Psalm 103:19). This term describes God’s complete control over all things, including our lives and our destinies.
  5. Immutability – “For I am the Lord, I do not change” (Malachi 3:6). This term describes God’s unchanging nature and character.
  6. Holiness – “You are of purer eyes than to behold evil, and cannot look on wickedness” (Habakkuk 1:13). This term describes God’s perfect moral goodness and purity.
  7. Love – “God is love” (1 John 4:8). This term describes God’s unconditional and unending love for His creation.
  8. Faithfulness – “If we are faithless, He remains faithful” (2 Timothy 2:13). This term describes God’s loyalty and reliability to His promises.

How I am That I am Proves God Exists

The phrase “I am That I am” is often used to demonstrate the existence of God. The phrase is a declaration of God’s self-existence, His timelessness, and His power and authority over all of creation. It is an affirmation of the idea that God is real and that His power and presence can be felt in our lives.

The phrase “I am That I am” is also used to illustrate the relationship between God and man. It is a reminder that God is always with us, no matter what we may be facing or going through. It is a reminder that God is always present, even in times of distress or difficulty.

The story of Moses is one of the most iconic stories in the Bible, and it is full of profound religious and historical implications. Specifically, when Moses asks God his name, God’s response of “I am that I am” has become a powerful phrase used to describe the nature of God himself. But what did this phrase mean to Moses and to the Israelites in the ancient world?

In the Bible, God’s response to Moses is found in Exodus 3:14. When Moses asks God his name, God answers “I am that I am”, or in Hebrew, “Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh”. The phrase, while mysterious in its meaning, is clearly important. It is the first time in the Bible that God reveals his name, and it is a significant moment in the story of Moses and the Israelites.

So what did it mean for Moses and the Israelites? In the ancient world, a name was not just a label, but a representation of a person’s essence and character. When God reveals his name, he is not just providing a title, but a way to understand his being. As the phrase “I am that I am” suggests, God is a being that is eternal and unchanging, an ever-present source of power and strength.

The phrase “I am that I am” also serves as a reminder of God’s role in the world. As an eternal being, God is the source of all life and all creation. He is the one who gives life, sustains it, and ultimately brings it to an end. He is the one who provides guidance and protection to his people, and who calls them to a life of faithful obedience to him.

The phrase “I am that I am” is a reminder of God’s power and presence in the world. It is a reminder of his eternal nature and of his role as the one true God. It is a reminder of his love and care for his people, and of the need to live in faithful obedience to him. As such, it is an incredibly important phrase in the Bible and in the religious and historical context of the ancient world.

10 – Facts about God’s Existence

  1. The Bible: The Bible is the most well-known written record of God’s existence. It is a collection of books written by numerous authors over a period of more than a thousand years and is considered to be the Word of God. It contains detailed descriptions of God’s character and activities, his plans for the world, and his interactions with humans. The Bible is a powerful testament to the existence of God.
  2. Nature: Nature is one of the most powerful proofs of God’s existence. From the intricate complexity of the human body to the majestic beauty of a mountain range, nature is a reflection of the creative power of God. The complexity and design of nature are often pointed to as evidence of a higher power.
  3. Miracles: Miracles are extraordinary events that defy natural explanation. They are often seen as proof of God’s existence because they show that God is capable of performing acts that are outside of the laws of nature. Examples of miracles include Jesus ’ healing of a man’s blindness and the parting of the Red Sea by Moses.
  4. Fulfilled Prophecies: The Bible contains numerous prophecies , many of which have been fulfilled. These prophecies point to the existence of an all-knowing God who has control over the future.
  5. The Cosmological Argument: The cosmological argument is an argument for the existence of God based on the idea that everything in the universe must have a cause. Since the universe itself is an effect, it must have a cause which is God.
  6. The Teleological Argument: The teleological argument is an argument for the existence of God based on the idea that the universe appears to be designed. This design, or purpose, can only be explained by the existence of an intelligent creator.
  7. The Moral Argument: The moral argument is an argument for the existence of God based on the idea that morality requires a higher power. The idea is that morality cannot be explained through natural processes and must therefore come from an outside source, which is God.
  8. The Ontological Argument: The ontological argument is an argument for the existence of God based on the idea that the concept of God is self-evident. This argument argues that the concept of God is so perfect that it must exist in reality.
  9. The Argument from Desire: The argument from desire is an argument for the existence of God based on the idea that humans have an innate longing for something outside of themselves. This longing is evidence of a higher power and is proof of God’s existence.
  10. The Argument from Consciousness: The argument from consciousness is an argument for the existence of God based on the idea that consciousness cannot be explained by natural processes. This argument argues that consciousness must come from an outside source, which is God.

Exploring the Bible Verses (Scripture) of I am That I am

The phrase “I am That I am” is found in a variety of Bible verses (Scripture) throughout the Old and New Testaments. In the Old Testament, the phrase is found in Exodus 3:14, “God said to Moses, ‘I am that I am.’” In the New Testament, the phrase is found in John 8:58, “Jesus said, ‘I am the one I have been from the beginning.’”

These verses can be used to explore the significance of the phrase “I am That I am” and its implications for understanding the divine. These verses can be used to discuss the relationship between God and man, the power and presence of God in our lives, and the importance of having faith in God.

A Closer Look at the I am That I am Bible Verse

The phrase “I am That I am” is found in the book of Exodus in the Bible (Scripture). In this verse, God is speaking to Moses and is declaring His name and His self-existence. This phrase is seen as a declaration of God’s eternal nature and His power and authority over all of creation.

This verse can be used to explore the significance of the phrase “I am That I am” and its implications for understanding the divine. It can be used to discuss the relationship between God and man, the power and presence of God in our lives, and the importance of having faith in God.

A Bible Study of I am That I am

The phrase “I am That I am” is an important concept for understanding the divine. It is a powerful affirmation of God’s self-existence and His sovereignty over all of creation. It is often used to discuss the relationship between God and man, the power and presence of God in our lives, and the importance of having faith in God.

A Bible study of “I am That I am” can be a great way to explore the implications of this phrase for understanding the divine. It can be used to discuss the relationship between God and man, the power and presence of God in our lives, and the importance of having faith in God.

Simple Outline

  1. Introduction to the Concept of “I Am That I Am”
  2. Biblical Context of the Verse
  3. The Meaning of “I Am That I Am”
  4. How to Apply the Verse in Our Lives
  5. Practical Exercises to Explore “I Am That I Am”
  6. Discussion and Reflection on the Verse
  7. Conclusions on “I Am That I Am”

A Study of I am That I am in the Context of John Piper’s Theology

John Piper is an American Baptist pastor and author, who is best known for his ministry at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He is also the founder and teacher of desiringGod.org, an online ministry devoted to helping people grow in their knowledge and love of God.

He is a prolific writer, having written over 50 books, including the best-selling “Desiring God” and “A Hunger for God.” He has also written several essays and articles for various magazines and newspapers. In addition to his writing, he has served as a pastor, mentor, and encourager to many Christians around the world. His ministry has been an encouragement to millions of people, and his influence has been far-reaching.

What the I am That I am Bible Verse Teaches Us

The phrase “I am That I am” is a powerful declaration of God’s self-existence and His sovereignty over all of creation. It is a reminder of God’s promise to be with us always and of the power and presence of God in our lives. It is often used to discuss the relationship between God and man, the power and presence of God in our lives, and the importance of having faith in God.

The phrase “I am That I am” teaches us that God is real, that He is powerful and present in our lives, and that He is always with us, no matter what we may be facing or going through. It is also a reminder that we can always turn to God in times of distress or difficulty and that He will never forsake us.

I Am Who you Say I Am bible Verse

The phrase “I am who you say I am” isn’t directly found in most traditional Bible translations. However, the essence of this statement aligns with instances where Jesus interacts with His disciples, particularly in the Gospels, about His identity. The closest biblical passage that captures this sentiment is found in Matthew 16:13-20, where Peter confesses that Jesus is the Christ.

Let’s delve into an expositor breakdown of this portion:


Matthew 16:13-20 (NIV)

“When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, ‘Who do people say the Son of Man is?’ They replied, ‘Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still, others, Jeremiah or one of the prophets.’ ‘But what about you?’ he asked. Who do you say I am?’ Simon Peter answered, ‘You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.’ Jesus replied, ‘Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by flesh and blood, but by my Father in heaven.’


Expositor Breakdown:

  • Setting (Caesarea Philippi): A region known for its pagan worship, making it a profound setting for Jesus to inquire about His divine identity.
  • Question about the ‘Son of Man’: “Son of Man” is a title Jesus frequently used to refer to Himself. It encompasses both His humanity and divinity.
  • Disciples’ Response: The various names listed (John the Baptist, Elijah, Jeremiah) indicate the confusion or varied perceptions among the masses regarding Jesus ’ true identity.
  • Jesus’ Direct Question to His Disciples: By asking “Who do you say I am?”, Jesus challenges His closest followers to go beyond popular opinion and recognize His true nature.
  • Peter’s Confession: Peter’s acknowledgment of Jesus as “the Messiah, the Son of the living God” is foundational. It not only underscores Jesus’ messianic role but also His divine relationship with God the Father.
  • Jesus’ Affirmation: Jesus blesses Peter for his insight, noting it was divinely revealed. This underscores the belief that true recognition of Jesus’ identity is a spiritual revelation from God.

In essence, while Jesus doesn’t directly say, “I am who you say I am,” His interactions, especially with Peter, solidify His identity as acknowledged by His followers. This understanding is central to Christian belief.

Final Thoughts – I am Who you say I Am Bible Verse

The phrase “I am That I am” (Scripture) is a powerful declaration of God’s self-existence and His sovereignty over all of creation. It is a reminder of God’s promise to be with us always and of the power and presence of God in our lives. It is often used to discuss the relationship between God and man, the power and presence of God in our lives, and the importance of having faith in God.

This blog post has explored the phrase “I am That I am” and its implications for understanding the divine. We have looked at the Hebrew and Greek versions of the phrase, discussed its significance, and explored the Bible verses that contain the phrase. We have also discussed how the phrase “I am That I am” proves the existence of God and examined the meaning of the phrase in the context of John Piper’s theology.

In conclusion, the phrase “I am That I am” is a powerful reminder of God’s self-existence and His sovereignty over all of creation. It is a reminder that God is always with us, no matter what we may be facing or going through. It is a reminder that we can always turn to God in times of distress or difficulty and that He will never forsake us.

New Testament Commentaries

Below is a table featuring some renowned New Testament commentaries, their publishers, and websites where they can be found. Please note that availability may vary and it’s always beneficial to check multiple sources for acquiring these commentaries.

Commentary NamePublisherWebsite
The New International Commentary on the New Testament EerdmansEerdmans
Word Biblical CommentaryZondervanZondervan
Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New TestamentBaker AcademicBaker Academic
The New Testament for EveryoneWestminster John Knox PressWestminster John Knox Press
Tyndale New Testament CommentariesInterVarsity PressInterVarsity Press
Expositor’s Bible CommentaryZondervanZondervan
The Anchor Yale Bible CommentaryYale University PressYale University Press
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How to be saved according to the Bible    In order to understand how to be saved, we first need to understand what salvation is. Salvation is when God forgives our sins and gives us eternal life. It's a free gift from God that we can't earn on our own. So how do we receive this gift? The Bible tells us that there are six steps: hearing, believing, repenting, confessing, repenting again, and believers baptism. Let's break each one of these down.     Hearing - The first step is hearing the gospel. The gospel is the good news that Jesus died on the cross for our sins and rose again. This news must be heard in order for us to believe it.     Believing - Once we hear the gospel, we must believe it. This means that we trust that Jesus is who He says He is and that He can save us from our sins.     Repenting - Once we believe the gospel, we must repent of our sins. This means that we turn away from our sin and start living for God.     Confessing - After we repent of our sins, we need to confess them to God. This means that we tell God all of the sinful things we have done and ask Him for forgiveness.     Believers Baptism - The final step is believers baptism. This is when a person who has already believed and repented is baptized in water as an outward sign of their inward decision to follow Christ. Baptism doesn't save us, but it's an important step of obedience for every Christian.     Discipling others -  Finally, once we have received salvation through these steps, it's important that we continue to grow in our faith and share the gospel with others so they too can be saved.      These are the six steps required for salvation according to the Bible: hearing, believing, repenting, confessing, repenting again, and believers baptism. If you have never done these things or if you're not sure if you've done them correctly, I encourage you to talk to a pastor or other Christian friend who can help guide you through these steps. Salvation is a free gift from God, but it's one that we need to take intentional steps to receive. Don't wait another day - start your journey towards salvation today!

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