fbpx
Skip to content

The Difference Between Apostles and Prophets: Unveiling Divine Roles and Responsibilities | Apostle | Prophet | Apostolic | PDF | Quiz | Classes

Difference Between Apostles and Prophets

Difference Between Apostles and Prophets – Religious terminology can sometimes be intricate, especially when it comes to distinguishing between various divine roles and titles. Among such distinctions, the terms “apostle” and “prophet” often spark curiosity and debate. What exactly sets them apart? How do their roles and responsibilities differ? In this comprehensive article, we will delve into the difference between apostles and prophets, shedding light on their distinct characteristics, duties, and significance. Whether you’re a devout believer or simply curious about religious semantics, this exploration will provide you with valuable insights into these revered figures.

Difference Between Apostles and Prophets (difference)

Undoubtedly, apostles and prophets hold esteemed positions within religious communities. Both are regarded as individuals who receive divine revelations and play vital roles in guiding believers. However, their functions and areas of influence differ significantly. Let’s delve into the core differences between apostles and prophets:

1. Definition and Etymology

Before exploring their disparities, let’s establish a foundational understanding of these terms:

  • Apostle: The word “apostle” derives from the Greek word “apostolos,” meaning “one who is sent forth” or “messenger.” Apostles are seen as individuals who are divinely chosen and sent to spread the teachings of a religious faith, acting as ambassadors of faith and spiritual leaders.
  • Prophet: The term “prophet” originates from the Greek word “prophētēs,” which translates to “one who speaks on behalf of a deity.” Prophets are individuals who receive direct communication from a higher power and convey these revelations to others, often providing guidance, warnings, or predictions.

2. Nature of Calling

The distinction between apostles and prophets becomes evident when examining the nature of their respective callings:

  • Apostles: Apostles are typically chosen and commissioned by a religious authority, such as a deity, a religious leader, or a higher council. Their calling involves a clear appointment and an explicit mandate to disseminate the faith’s teachings, establish new communities, and guide believers.
  • Prophets: Prophets, on the other hand, are primarily called directly by a higher power, such as a deity, to receive and communicate divine messages. Their calling often involves an intense personal encounter or revelation, compelling them to speak on behalf of the divine and fulfill a specific purpose or mission.

3. Scope of Authority

The difference between apostles and prophets is also reflected in the scope of their authority and influence within religious structures:

  • Apostles: Apostles generally hold a broader authority and are entrusted with the establishment of new religious communities or the oversight of existing ones. They may have the power to appoint leaders, shape doctrines, and guide the direction of the faith. Their role is often considered foundational in the growth and expansion of a religious movement.
  • Prophets: Prophets, while influential in their own right, typically possess a more localized authority. They are recognized as direct conduits of divine messages, conveying spiritual insights, warnings, or guidance to individuals, communities, or even entire nations. Their impact is often focused on specific situations or contexts rather than organizational structures.
Difference Between Apostles and Prophets

4. Teachings and Revelations

Another noteworthy distinction lies in the nature of the messages delivered by apostles and prophets:

  • Apostles: Apostles primarily focus on disseminating and interpreting the foundational teachings of a religious faith. They often elucidate doctrines, provide theological

understandings, and clarify any ambiguities or misconceptions within the faith community. Their teachings aim to establish a solid doctrinal framework and ensure unity among believers.

  • Prophets: Prophets, on the other hand, emphasize receiving and delivering direct revelations from a higher power. Their messages often address specific circumstances, offer guidance, and sometimes foretell future events. Prophets are seen as spiritual guides, providing insights and direction in times of uncertainty or crisis.

5. Temporal Context

The historical context in which apostles and prophets emerge is another aspect that sets them apart:

  • Apostles: Apostles are often associated with the founding era of a religious movement or community. They play a pivotal role in establishing the initial infrastructure, spreading the faith’s teachings, and laying the groundwork for future generations. Apostles are typically recognized as key figures in the early development and expansion of a religious tradition.
  • Prophets: Prophets, on the other hand, can arise at any point in history, as they are called by a higher power in response to specific needs or circumstances. Their messages address the challenges, concerns, or spiritual needs of their contemporaries. Prophets are often seen as divine instruments, called to guide and inspire people during critical times.
Difference Between Apostles and Prophets

6. Succession and Continuity

The manner in which apostles and prophets are succeeded and their legacies carried forward also showcases a difference:

  • Apostles: Apostleship can be perceived as a position that is passed down or succeeded in an organized manner. Successors are often chosen based on established criteria, such as knowledge, adherence to doctrines, or spiritual qualifications. The apostolic lineage ensures continuity in leadership, maintaining the faith’s core values and teachings.
  • Prophets: Prophetic calling, in contrast, is often considered unique and individualized. While there may be instances of prophetic succession within specific religious traditions, the calling itself is not necessarily confined to a lineage or a predetermined succession plan. Prophets arise as and when divinely ordained, with each prophet bringing a fresh perspective and message for their time.
Difference Between Apostles and Prophets

Apostles in the Bible

In the context of the Christian Bible, an “apostle” is a term of significant importance and nuance. The term originates from the Greek word “apostolos” which means “one who is sent forth.” Thus, at its most basic level, an apostle is someone who is sent on a mission as a messenger or representative.

In the New Testament of the Bible, the term “apostle” is primarily used to refer to the twelve disciples whom Jesus Christ personally chose and commissioned to spread the Gospel. These twelve disciples include Peter , James, John, Andrew, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot, who was later replaced by Matthias (as narrated in Acts 1:12-26) following his betrayal of Jesus.

These Apostles were given specific authority by Jesus Christ. In Mark 3:14-15, the scripture narrates, “He appointed twelve that they might be with him and that he might send them out to preach and to have authority to drive out demons.” This indicates their distinctive roles, not only as messengers of the Gospel but also as individuals possessing divine authority.

Paul, although not part of the original twelve, is also considered an apostle, as he was directly commissioned by the resurrected Christ on the road to Damascus (Acts 9:3-6). Paul’s letters and teachings form a substantial part of the New Testament.

It is also important to note that the term “apostle” is occasionally used in a broader sense within the New Testament, referring to individuals who played significant roles in the early Christian movement but were not part of the twelve or Paul. Examples include Barnabas (Acts 14:14), James, the brother of Jesus (Galatians 1:19), and possibly Apollos and Timothy.

In summary, in the Biblical context, an apostle is a person who has been called and sent forth by Jesus Christ to proclaim the Gospel, establish churches, and carry out His mission with a specific divine authority. They are foundational figures in the establishment of the early Christian Church and the dissemination of its teachings.

  1. Simon Peter (Matthew 10:2-4): He was one of the first disciples called by Jesus and was the leader of the twelve apostles . Peter is known for his faith and devotion to Jesus, even when faced with opposition.
  2. Andrew (John 1:40-42): He was the brother of Simon Peter and the first disciple Jesus called. He was known for his enthusiasm and courage in spreading the gospel message.
  3. James (Matthew 10:2-4): He was the brother of John and was known for his fiery passion . He was also the first apostle to be martyred for his faith.
  4. John (John 1:40-42): He was the brother of James and the beloved disciple. He was known for his boldness and loyalty to Jesus.
  5. Phillip (John 1:43-45): He was the first to bring Nathanael to Jesus. He was known for his boldness and faith in Jesus.
  6. Bartholomew (Matthew 10:3): He was also known as Nathanael and was known for his quick wit and intelligence.
  7. Thomas (John 11:16): He was known for his honest questions and doubts about Jesus’ teachings. He was also the one who famously said, “Let us also go, that we may die with Him.”
  8. Matthew (Matthew 9:9): He was known as a tax collector but was also a disciple of Jesus. He was known for his humility and his willingness to serve.
  9. James the son of Alphaeus (Matthew 10:3): He was also known as James the Less and was the brother of Matthew. He was known for his faith and loyalty to Jesus.
  10. Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:3): He was also known as Judas , the son of James. He was known for his outspokenness and his willingness to challenge those in power.
  11. Simon the Zealot (Luke 6:15): He was also known as Simon the Cananaean and was known for his passion and zeal for the Lord.
  12. Judas Iscariot (Matthew 10:4): He was the betrayer of Jesus and was known for his greed and betrayal.

12 New Testament Qualifications of an Apostle

  1. Selected by Jesus – Acts 1:2: This verse states that Jesus Himself chose and appointed the apostles. He chose twelve of them to be His special witnesses to confirm and spread His teachings.
  2. Witness of the resurrected Christ – Acts 1:22: This verse states that the apostles were chosen to be witnesses of Jesus’ resurrection and all He taught. They were to spread the news of His resurrection to the world.
  3. Baptized with the Spirit – Acts 2:4: This verse states that the apostles were baptized with the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. This gave them the power to spread the gospel to the world and perform miracles in Jesus ’ name.
  4. Have seen the Lord – 1 Corinthians 9:1: This verse states that the apostles had seen the Lord and had been with Him during His earthly ministry. This was a prerequisite for being an apostle as they were to be His witnesses to confirm His teachings.
  5. Signs and wonders – 2 Corinthians 12:12: This verse states that the apostles performed signs and wonders in the name of Jesus in order to validate their teachings. This was a way of confirming that Jesus was the Son of God and that His teachings were true.
  6. Sent by the Holy Spirit – Acts 13:2-4: This verse states that the apostles were sent out by the Holy Spirit to spread the gospel to the Gentiles. This shows that they were given the authority and power to spread the gospel to the world.
  7. Preached the gospel – Acts 8:4: This verse states that the apostles preached the gospel to the Samaritans. This shows that they were to spread the good news to all peoples and not just to the Jews.
  8. Performed miracles – Acts 5:12: This verse states that the apostles performed many miracles and signs in the name of Jesus. This was a way of confirming to the world that Jesus was the Son of God and that His teachings were true.
  9. Endured persecution – Acts 8:1: This verse states that the apostles endured much persecution for preaching the gospel. This shows that they were willing to suffer for the cause of Jesus and for His teachings.
  10. Appointed elders – Acts 14:23: This verse states that the apostles appointed elders in the church. This shows that they were responsible for the organization and leadership of the early church .
  11. Written New Testament – 2 Peter 3:15-16: This verse states that the apostles wrote the New Testament. This shows that they were responsible for the writing of the books of the Bible .
  12. Qualified by the Church – 1 Timothy 4:14: This verse states that the apostles were approved and qualified by the church. This shows that the church recognized and affirmed the apostles’ authority and teachings.

Prophets in the Bible (prophecy)

In the Christian Bible , the term “prophet” holds significant connotations and distinct importance. The term originates from the Greek word “prophētēs,” which can be etymologically deconstructed into “pro” meaning “before” or “forth,” and “phētēs” from “phēmi,” meaning “to speak.” Thus, a prophet, in the simplest terms, can be understood as “one who speaks forth” or “one who speaks on behalf of another.”

Biblically, a prophet is recognized as a spokesperson for God, an individual selected and ordained by God to deliver His messages to the people. These messages could be warnings, admonishments, encouragements, revelations about the future, or instructions for specific actions. The role of the prophet was not confined to foretelling future events (as commonly misunderstood today), but more importantly, involved forth-telling, i.e., speaking God’s truth to the situations and challenges of their time.

Prophets played a vital role in the Old Testament, serving as intermediaries between God and His people. Major prophets like Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, and minor prophets like Amos, Micah, and Hosea, were divinely inspired to reveal God’s will, commands, and purposes to His people. They often served in times of national crisis or spiritual apostasy, calling people to repentance and adherence to God’s law.

In the New Testament, the role of the prophet evolves within the context of the early church. Prophets, as mentioned in the writings of Paul, were regarded as one of the gifts of the Spirit to the Church. As seen in 1 Corinthians 12:28 and Ephesians 4:11, prophets were regarded as integral for the building up and edification of the body of Christ. They were given the responsibility of exhortation, consolation, and revealing God’s truth to believers.

Furthermore, Jesus Christ is depicted as the ultimate Prophet in the New Testament, fulfilling the prophecy in Deuteronomy 18:15, where Moses states that God will raise up a Prophet like him from among the Israelites. Jesus, as the Prophet, not only foretells the future but also unveils the fullness of God’s salvation plan through His teachings, life, death, and resurrection.

In conclusion, in the Biblical context, a prophet is an individual divinely appointed and inspired by God to deliver His messages, warn of His judgements, comfort His people, and reveal His will to individuals, nations, and the Church. This role was critically important for the spiritual guidance of God’s people throughout Biblical history.

  1. Adam: Genesis 1:26-31, Adam was the first human created by God. He and his wife, Eve, were given the command to be fruitful and multiply, and they were also given dominion over the earth.
  2. Noah: Genesis 6:9-22, Noah was chosen by God to build an ark and save his family and the animals of the earth from the great flood. He was a righteous man and a symbol of faithfulness.
  3. Abraham: Genesis 12:1-9, Abraham is considered the father of the Jewish people . He was chosen by God to be the father of many nations and through him all nations would be blessed.
  4. Isaac: Genesis 22:1-19, Isaac was the son of Abraham and the father of Jacob. He was the ancestor of the twelve tribes of Israel . He was also the recipient of the blessing of Abraham.
  5. Jacob: Genesis 25:19-28, Jacob was the twin brother of Esau, the grandson of Abraham, and the father of the twelve sons of Israel. He was also the recipient of the blessing of Abraham.
  6. Moses: Exodus 3:1-22, Moses is considered the most important prophet in the Bible. He was chosen by God to lead the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt and to deliver the Ten Commandments to them.
  7. Samuel: 1 Samuel 3:1-21, Samuel was a prophet , judge, and priest. He anointed Saul and David as the first two kings of Israel. He also served as a mediator between God and the Israelites.
  8. David: 2 Samuel 7:1-29, David was a king of Israel and a psalmist. He was a man after God’s own heart and is renowned for his courage and faithfulness to God.
  9. Isaiah: Isaiah 6:1-13, Isaiah was a powerful prophet who spoke out against the sins of Israel. He was sent to bring the people back to God and proclaim the coming of the Messiah.
  10. Jeremiah: Jeremiah 1:1-19, Jeremiah was a prophet during the time of the destruction of Jerusalem. He was a faithful messenger of God who proclaimed the coming judgment and the eventual restoration of Israel.
  11. Ezekiel: Ezekiel 1:1-28, Ezekiel was a prophet of God during the Babylonian exile. He was given visions of judgement and hope for the future of Israel.
  12. Daniel: Daniel 1:1-21, Daniel was a prophet during the Babylonian exile. He interpreted dreams and visions, and he was given insight into the future of Israel.
  13. Hosea: Hosea 1:1-11, Hosea was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Israel. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming exile.
  14. Joel: Joel 1:1-20, Joel was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of the people. He proclaimed the coming judgement and the need for repentance.
  15. Amos: Amos 1:1-15, Amos was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Israel. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming exile.
  16. Obadiah: Obadiah 1:1-21, Obadiah was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Israel. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming exile.
  17. Jonah: Jonah 1:1-17, Jonah was a prophet who disobeyed God’s command to preach to the people of Nineveh. He was swallowed by a great fish and eventually repented of his disobedience.
  18. Micah: Micah 1:1-16, Micah was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Israel. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming exile.
  19. Nahum: Nahum 1:1-15, Nahum was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Nineveh. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming destruction.
  20. Habakkuk: Habakkuk 1:1-17, Habakkuk was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Judah. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming destruction.
  21. Zephaniah: Zephaniah 1:1-18, Zephaniah was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Judah. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming destruction.
  22. Haggai: Haggai 1:1-15, Haggai was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Judah. He encouraged the people to rebuild the temple and proclaimed judgement for those who refused.
  23. Zechariah: Zechariah 1:1-21, Zechariah was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Judah. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming destruction.
  24. Malachi: Malachi 1:1-14, Malachi was a prophet who spoke out against the sins of Judah. He proclaimed judgement and warned of the coming destruction.
  25. John the Baptist: Matthew 3:1-12, John the Baptist was a prophet who proclaimed the coming of the Messiah. He baptized Jesus and declared Him to be the Son of God.

10 Bible Qualifications of a Prophet (teachers)

  1. A prophet must be called by God – Amos 3:7: “Surely the Lord God does nothing without revealing his secret to his servants the prophets.”
  2. A prophet must have a revelation from God – Amos 3:8: “The lion has roared; who will not fear? The Lord God has spoken; who can but prophesy?”
  3. A prophet must speak God’s words – Deuteronomy 18:18-20: “I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their brothers. And I will put my words in his mouth, and he shall speak to them all that I command him.”
  4. A prophet must have a message for God’s people – Jeremiah 1:4-5: “Now the word of the Lord came to me, saying, ‘Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations.’”
  5. A prophet must be a faithful witness – Isaiah 43:10: “You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “and my servant whom I have chosen, that you may know and believe me and understand that I am he. Before me no god was formed, nor shall there be any after me.”
  6. A prophet must be obedient to God – Deuteronomy 18:19: “And whoever will not listen to my words that he shall speak in my name, I myself will require it of him.”
  7. A prophet must be filled with the Holy Spirit – Acts 2:17-18: “And in the last days it shall be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams.”
  8. A prophet must be humble – Micah 6:8: “He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?”
  9. A prophet must be discerning – Isaiah 8:20: “To the teaching and to the testimony! If they will not speak according to this word, it is because they have no dawn.”
  10. A prophet must be truthful – Jeremiah 5:31: “The prophets prophesy falsely, and the priests rule at their direction; my people love to have it so, but what will you do when the end comes?”

FAQs about the Difference Between Apostles and Prophets

To further clarify the distinction between apostles and prophets, here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

1. Are apostles and prophets mutually exclusive roles?

No, apostles and prophets are not mutually exclusive roles. In some cases, an individual can embody both roles simultaneously. However, it is important to note that apostleship and prophethood have distinct characteristics and functions, and not all apostles are prophets, and vice versa.

2. Can someone be an apostle or prophet today?

According to religious beliefs, apostleship in the traditional sense, as seen in the early days of religious movements, is often considered to have ceased. However, some religious traditions recognize contemporary apostles who are entrusted with similar responsibilities, albeit in a different context. Prophets, on the other hand, are seen as individuals who can arise at any time based on divine calling.

3. Are apostles and prophets infallible?

No, apostles and prophets are not regarded as infallible beings. While they are believed to have a unique connection with the divine, they are still human and susceptible to fallibility. Their messages and teachings are often evaluated within the religious community, and the discernment of their authenticity lies with the believers.

4. Do apostles and prophets have different levels of authority?

Yes, apostles and prophets have different levels of authority within religious structures. Apostles often hold broader authority, overseeing organizational aspects, shaping doctrines, and establishing communities. Prophets, while influential

in their own right, typically have a more localized authority, focusing on delivering specific messages and providing guidance in specific contexts.

5. Can apostles and prophets exist in different religious traditions?

Yes, apostles and prophets can exist in different religious traditions. The specific titles and roles may vary across various faiths, but the underlying concept of individuals who receive divine revelations and guide believers is present in many religious traditions worldwide.

6. What is the significance of apostles and prophets in religious communities?

Apostles and prophets hold immense significance in religious communities. They are seen as channels of divine wisdom and guidance, providing believers with spiritual direction, moral teachings, and a deeper understanding of their faith. Their presence brings a sense of continuity, authority, and inspiration to religious communities, fostering growth and unity among followers.

Final Thoughts – Difference Between Apostles and Prophets

In conclusion, while apostles and prophets both play crucial roles in religious contexts, they differ in various aspects. Apostles are messengers sent forth to establish and guide religious communities, while prophets receive direct revelations and convey divine messages to individuals or communities.

The scope of their authority, the nature of their teachings, and the historical context in which they arise all contribute to the distinction between these divine roles. Understanding the difference between apostles and prophets provides valuable insights into the dynamics of religious leadership and the diverse ways in which divine guidance manifests within different faith traditions.

How to be saved according to the Bible    In order to understand how to be saved, we first need to understand what salvation is. Salvation is when God forgives our sins and gives us eternal life. It's a free gift from God that we can't earn on our own. So how do we receive this gift? The Bible tells us that there are six steps: hearing, believing, repenting, confessing, repenting again, and believers baptism. Let's break each one of these down.     Hearing - The first step is hearing the gospel. The gospel is the good news that Jesus died on the cross for our sins and rose again. This news must be heard in order for us to believe it.     Believing - Once we hear the gospel, we must believe it. This means that we trust that Jesus is who He says He is and that He can save us from our sins.     Repenting - Once we believe the gospel, we must repent of our sins. This means that we turn away from our sin and start living for God.     Confessing - After we repent of our sins, we need to confess them to God. This means that we tell God all of the sinful things we have done and ask Him for forgiveness.     Believers Baptism - The final step is believers baptism. This is when a person who has already believed and repented is baptized in water as an outward sign of their inward decision to follow Christ. Baptism doesn't save us, but it's an important step of obedience for every Christian.     Discipling others -  Finally, once we have received salvation through these steps, it's important that we continue to grow in our faith and share the gospel with others so they too can be saved.      These are the six steps required for salvation according to the Bible: hearing, believing, repenting, confessing, repenting again, and believers baptism. If you have never done these things or if you're not sure if you've done them correctly, I encourage you to talk to a pastor or other Christian friend who can help guide you through these steps. Salvation is a free gift from God, but it's one that we need to take intentional steps to receive. Don't wait another day - start your journey towards salvation today!

Author

  • Greg Gaines

    Father / Grandfather / Minister / Missionary / Deacon / Elder / Author / Digital Missionary / Foster Parents / Welcome to our Family https://jesusleadershiptraining.com/about-us/

Spread the Gospel