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Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership? | Leadership

Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership?
  • Lack of Growth
  • Community Spirit
  • Maturity
  • Developing of Leaders

Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership?

Servant leadership is a style of management that emphasizes putting the needs of others first. This type of leadership can have many benefits for both the leader and their team. Some common outcomes of servant leadership include higher morale, increased productivity, and improved communication. However, there is one outcome that is not often associated with this type of leadership…

What is Servant Leadership?

From a Business Standpoint:

Servant leadership is a leadership philosophy where the leader’s main goal is to serve their employees and customers. The idea behind servant leadership came from Robert Greenleaf, who wrote an essay in 1970 titled “The Servant as Leader”. He believed that businesses would be more successful if they had leaders who were devoted to serving others first and worrying about their own success second.

There are many outcomes of servant leadership, but one outcome that is often mentioned is the development of leaders from within the company. When employees feel like they are being served by their leader, they are more likely to want to develop into leaders themselves. This allows for a culture of continuous growth and improvement within the company.

Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership 1
Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership?

Another outcome of servant leadership is increased employee engagement and satisfaction. Employees who feel appreciated and valued are more likely to be engaged in their work and be satisfied with their job. This leads to lower turnover rates and less need for replacements, which saves the company time and money.

So, what is the outcome that is not an outcome of servant leadership? The answer is profits, retention, progress, and growth. While servant leadership can lead to increased profits, it is not the main goal of the leader. The focus is on serving others first and foremost, which leads to a more successful company in the long run.

What are the Benefits of Servant Leadership?

Some of the benefits of servant leadership are:

  • Enhanced productivity and performance through teamwork.
  • A more tightly-knit, cohesive working unit that is not bogged down by cliques or hierarchies.
  • Improved employee retention rates because employees who feel appreciated tend to stay with their current employer longer than those who do not feel similarly valued.
  • The ability of leaders to take on new challenges without fear or hesitation due to a lack of confidence in themselves, can lead them towards success instead of failure (and ultimately into better positions).
  • Leaders who practice servant leadership tend to be more humble and down-to-earth, which can make them more relatable and likable to those around them.
  • Finally, a culture of service breeds positive change within an organization – employees are empowered to take ownership of their work and contribute in ways that they may not have felt able to do before.

What are the Weaknesses of Servant Leadership?

Some of the weaknesses of servant style leadership are:

  • Lacks motivation and drive to achieve community goals
  • Requires total devotion of the leader and team members (this can be a strength or weakness depending on perspective)
  • The leader may not possess leadership abilities
  • Leaders may not be able to Lead (they can serve themselves but being able to lead a group of Servants is different)
  • Excellent at Serving – but Cannot Lead
  • Lacks a clear Vision and Objectives
  • May not get along with other people (peers) because of his/her background
  • May not Have Vision and
  • Strategy
  • Does Not Know how to Use Power and Influence
  • May Have Difficulty with Communication
  • As Churches grow the Leadership Skills also Grow

Can a Servant Leaders be Good at Serving and Not Be Able to Lead?

Yes, this is possible. Being a Servant Leader is more than being a servant and then leading people to do what they have been told to do. A true Servant Leader must have the ability to listen, love, put others first as well as be able to manage conflicts while staying focused on the team’s goals.

Serving: Many leaders are good at serving but only because they are forced to or it serves their own purpose of getting ahead quickly in a job that requires favoritism. In this case, you will find employees who will work hard for these types of managers because these managers set them up for success by helping them get ahead and avoid conflict within the company. However, there comes a point where an employee wants more from his/her leader and expects more than just being served.

Leading: A true Servant Leader is not only good at serving but also leading effectively. Leaders who can lead well will have followers who are inspired to achieve the vision or goal of the organization because they trust their leader. Leaders must learn how to develop a team, inspire them and give them what they need in order to succeed; which includes putting themselves second from time to time.

A servant leader does not have to be perfect but should always be working on becoming a better leader every day. It is important to know that there is no one way to lead and that we all have different styles that work for us. What works for me may not work for you

Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership 2

Examples of Biblical Servant Leaders?

They each had lives of great servant leadership and being Human were all imperfect vessels (except Jesus)

Some well-known examples are:

  • Moses – He was known as a great leader and servant. He led the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt and gave them the Ten Commandments.
  • King David – He was known as a “man after God’s own heart” and ruled over Israel for 40 years.
  • Jesus Christ – The ultimate example of a servant leader, Jesus taught His disciples about servanthood and how to love others selflessly.
  • Pope Francis – He is the current Pope of the Catholic Church and has been praised for his humble lifestyle and dedication to serving others.
  • Joseph – He was the patriarch of the Israelites and is known for his wisdom and compassion.
  • Abraham – He was the father of Israel and is known for his faith in God.
  • King Solomon – Known as one of the wisest men ever to live, he ruled over a united kingdom during peaceful times. His writings are included in many books of the Old Testament.
  • Paul – The apostle Paul wrote much of the New Testament and preached to Jews and Gentiles alike about Jesus Christ.
  • Jacob – He is the father of Israel and was known for his cunning nature.
  • Deborah – She was a judge in the Old Testament who led Israel during a time of great internal strife. She also acted as a mediator for two warring tribes to bring about peace between them.
  • Amos – A prophet from around 760-755 B.C., he spoke out against injustice, oppression, and idolatry throughout Northern Israelites.
  • Daniel – Known for being one of God’s most faithful followers, Daniel survived many trials including being thrown into a lion’s den by King Nebuchadnezzar (of Babylon). He continued serving God despite these hardships because he knew that “God had
  • Paul – The apostle Paul wrote much of the New Testament and preached to Jews and Gentiles alike about Jesus Christ.
  • Timothy – He was Paul’s protégé and became a leader of the early church.
  • Martin Luther – A Catholic monk who led the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century.
  • John Wesley – The founder of Methodism and one of the most influential figures in early Christianity.
  • Mother Teresa – A nun who dedicated her life to helping the poorest of the poor in India.
  • Barnabas – He was a follower of Jesus and encouraged others to be faithful in their service.
  • Stephen – A servant leader who led other early Christians by example, even giving his life for God’s cause.
  • Esther – The queen of Persia who saved her people from genocide at the hands of Haman (a Persian official).
  • The great prophet Isaiah wrote extensively about the role of servant leadership in ancient times – especially its importance to both rulers and those they ruled over: “He will be like rain on parched land or snow falling on barren ground. He will bring blessings to his people and prosperity back into their lives,” says Yahweh God through Isaiah at one point (Isaiah 51:11). “I have given you authority over all things; no power is greater than yours. Now go out there with strength and courage!” (John 14:12 NLT)
  • The Apostle Paul also wrote extensively about servant leadership in both epistles written while imprisoned by the Romans during his third missionary journey – Acts 27-28 being where these events took place which eventually led him before Caesar himself for trial according to Jewish law because they wanted capital punishment not just life imprisonment against this Christian who dared preach salvation without first converting those under them first like many other religions do today still today in 2019 AD time frame.
  • Jesus Christ himself was the ultimate example of servant leadership when he washed his disciples’ feet before eating with them at “The Last Supper” meal (Luke 22:24-27). He also gave an excellent illustration about what true Christian service looks like by telling us that it is better not just to serve God but also man through acts of kindness as well because both are important parts . . . perhaps even more so than simply being obedient unto Him alone if we want eternal life after this brief existence on earth ends someday soon enough; whether each one individually comes sooner or later, remains unknown until death actually happens!
  • While Jesus Christ did command his followers to go into all the world and make disciples of all nations, he also set an excellent example for them by washing his own feet before they did anything else together that evening on April 14th AD 30 during
  • “The Last Supper” meal (Luke 22:24-27). He gave an illustration about what true Christian service looks like when telling us it is better not just to serve God but also man through acts of kindness as well because both are important parts perhaps even more so than simply being obedient unto Him alone if we want eternal life after this brief existence here ends someday soon enough; whether each one individually comes sooner or later remains unknown until death actually happens!

Final Thoughts – Which of the following is not an Outcome of Servant Leadership?

Looking at the great examples above they were great models of servant leadership – and yet they all also had flaws. The Goal is to serve and lead in the best way we can allow God to Lead us.

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